Objects: Russian Street Art is Dead

Using new mediums and tools,  artists fill streets and public space with their works, thus creating a kind of open-air gallery in our cities.

Objects, a series of 3 books by Igor Ponosov, provides an overview of the birth, evolution and death of Russian street art from 2000-2009. Instead of an exhaustive analysis of all aspects of street art, the books provide only the most important information for readers to understand patterns of occurrence and development of forms of street art in Russia. The series gives readers the opportunity to familiarize themselves with various forms of street art, the transformations in modern graffiti, and to trace moments in the historical existence of this culture in Russia.

 

Over 4 years of prints study of the phenomenon of street art and were accompanied by online publications and exhibitions. It is impossible to say that whether it had any tangible benefit, but it certainly noted the decline of street art in Russia, from 2004-2009.

In 2004, Igor launched his Internet project Visualartifacts, which brought together the most important Russian street artists. A year later, the materials collected on this site became the basis for the first book of the Objects series.

 

Book 1:

The first book was a reflection of activity on the streets in 2005 and introduced many artists to a wider street activity. Then, in 2007, amidst major criticism of graffiti writers, various groups and projects increasingly began to reflect innovative approaches to graffiti.

 

Book 2:

At the end of 2008, the publication ceased to be a survey or illustrated catalog, and turned into a reference catalog for the exhibition and the idea of ​​joint development of forms of street art.

The goal of the third book was to facilitate the departure of street art from 2-D plane and the transition to three-dimensional objects. Becoming the next expansion of the boundaries of understanding of street art, this played a key role in the realization of urban space artists, but at the same time was a daunting task for the continuation of a series of Objects.

The lack of authenticity and contextuality in the works of street artists talking about the futility of street art in Russia allowed only endless imitation and copying of European trends. This sad moment marked the end of these books, and is expressed in the manifesto of the exhibition Russian Street-art is Dead.

 

Book 3:

While the format of a book series will not be continued, we are rethinking the experience to create similar projects and buying into the "Russian fund" along with several key street artists who are intent to begin work on a new, perhaps more important book

 

Where to buy:

5000 copies of Objects 1-3 were published and distributed throughout Russia and abroad. The third book is still available online at Indeksmarket and the rest have completely sold out.